Medical Laboratory Science Curriculum

Semester 1 – Fall

AMML110 – Gross Anatomy and Normal Microanatomy

This course examines the microscopic characteristics of the different tissues within the body systems. The objective of this course is to relate the recognizable tissue components to the principles of anatomy and, to a lesser degree, physiology. On a weekly basis, the theory is delivered in a three hour lecture. The lecture material will be posted on Blackboard a few days in advance to allow the students to print the course documents and take them to the lecture hall. The practical component is a three hour dry lab in the LRC studio. The digitized slides will be examined using the computer system. This is akin to the microscopic examination of glass slides. The students are expected to create their own atlas for revision purposes.

CCML112 – Clinical Chemistry I

This course provides the learner with the basic knowledge and skills necessary for practice in a Clinical Chemistry laboratory. Lectures discuss the function and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, enzymes, and fluids and electrolytes, and their clinical significance. Laboratory sessions introduce the learner to basic laboratory equipment and techniques.

Some aspects of this course require independent study. The principles and procedures mastered in this course will enable learners to perform, and understand why we perform, more advanced biochemical specimen examinations in the laboratory investigation and diagnosis of disorders of the body systems.

The course consists of theoretical and laboratory sessions. Theoretical material is presented either in instructional modules supported by tutorials or in lectures complemented by specific objectives and lecture outlines. Laboratory exercises are conducted in small groups and reinforce the basic practical skills required in clinical laboratories while emphasizing safe laboratory practice. Each laboratory exercise has defined practical outcomes; a Clinical Chemistry Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual will be provided. All lecture notes, marking schemes for laboratory exercises, and other relevant course material will be posted and available as required on the Blackboard Learning System website.

HEML112 – Introduction to Hematology 

This course provides the learner with an introduction to the basic knowledge and techniques necessary for the study of Hematology including the morphology of blood cells and the preparation, staining, and examination of peripheral blood films. Laboratory sessions introduce the learner to the use of the microscope, blood film preparation, staining and identification of blood cells. The procedures introduced in this course will enable learners to perform hematological specimen examinations used in the laboratory investigation and diagnosis of disease. 

MIML113 – Microbiology and Immunology 

This is an introductory Microbiology course for entry level students in the Medical Laboratory Science program. This course provides the learner with the basic knowledge and skills necessary for distinguishing between the normal microbial flora, opportunistic microorganisms and pathogenic microorganisms. Laboratory sessions introduce the learner to techniques for isolation and identification of significant microorganisms and for measuring the products of immune response. The learner will also be introduced to aspects of control and prevention of infection.

PPML110 – Normal and Pathophysiology 

This course introduces the learner to normal physiology and pathophysiology of the body’s cells, tissues, organs and organs systems. The course will progress through the various organ systems, emphasizing the interrelationship of structure and function and how the body systems work together to maintain homeostasis. This knowledge is then related to the specific Medical Laboratory Science subjects of Clinical Chemistry, Histotechnology, Immunology, Microbiology, Hematology and Transfusion Science. This course is intended to provide the learner with foundational knowledge that they will build upon as they progress through the program. Due to the intimate relationship between the structure and function of organs, the sequence of topics in PPML110 runs in parallel with those in AMML110 wherever possible.

VPML120 – Specimen procurement

This course provides the student with the knowledge and skills necessary for the performance of specimen collection, handling and processing, and basic troubleshooting of phlebotomy techniques. Theory is presented by short ‘within’ laboratory lectures that are supported by learning objectives. Practical laboratory exercises provide opportunities for application of theory; emphasize safety and patient care, and demonstration of technical skills. The practical skill competencies will be performed on simulated patients, peers, faculty, and other staff. This course requires some self-directed learning.

Semester 2 – Winter 

BAIP125 – Foundations of Interprofessional Collaboration for Medical Laboratory Technology Programs 

Interprofessional practice has become a preferred mode of team based practice in health care internationally. This is an online course for Diagnostic Cytology, Genetics Technology and Medical Laboratory Science students to build knowledge of interprofessional practice and collaboration. The first step towards interprofessional practice is a solid foundation of your professional role including expectations with respect to legislation, standards of practice, codes of ethics, consent, confidentiality/privacy etc. These foundational pieces will be developed throughout this course with an eye to meeting and exceeding the required provincial and national competencies surrounding professional responsibilities. Building on this foundation, the course will further introduce students to the concepts and support for interprofessional collaboration and education as well as reflective practice, effective communication, teamwork and conflict management. Each of these components is an essential skill in interprofessional practice. Students will engage in self-directed weekly learning activities, participate in seven online discussions and attend three face-to-face workshops during this course.

HEML120 – Hematology and Hemostasis 

This course provides the learner with an introduction to the basic knowledge and techniques necessary for the study of Hematology and Hemostasis. These include the theory of abnormal red blood cell formation and clot formation and dissolution. Laboratory sessions introduce the learner to the operation of automated cell counters and coagulation equipment as well as providing further opportunities to improve microscopy skills. The procedures introduced in this course will enable the learners to perform hematological and hemostatic examinations used in the laboratory investigation and diagnosis of anemia and bleeding disorders.

HIML110 – Introduction to Histotechnology 

This course provides the learner with an introduction to the basic knowledge and techniques necessary for the study of Histotechnology including the preparation and staining of tissue specimens. Laboratory sessions introduce the learner to the use of fixation, embedding, microtomy, and staining. The procedures introduced in this course will enable learners to perform histological specimen examinations used in the laboratory investigation and diagnosis of disorders of the body systems.

INML120 – Clinical Instrumentation 

The INML120: Clinical Instrumentation provides learners with the knowledge, skills and behaviour necessary for the performance of specimen examinations using a variety of clinical instruments. Lectures enhances the information delivered in first semester, specifically in principles of light measurement, electrochemical measurement, and immunoassay measurement techniques. Quality Management and Quality Control procedures are introduced as a means of validating patient test results. Laboratory sessions introduce the learner to the maintenance, operation and reporting of chartable patient test results using several Clinical Chemistry instruments. The course consists of theoretical sessions and laboratory sessions. Theoretical material is presented in lectures complemented by specific learning objectives, a textbook, PowerPoint presentations, instructional modules and selected readings. Laboratory exercises are conducted in small groups and reinforce the theoretical concepts and emphasize safe laboratory practice and quality management. Each laboratory exercise represents a performance assessment task with linked competencies and learning objectives and a Standard Operating Procedure Manual (SOP) is provided. All lecture notes, marking schemes for laboratory exercises, and other relevant course material will be posted and available as required on the Blackboard Learning System website.

MIML121 – Applied Microbiology 

This second semester microbiology course teaches the necessary procedures and techniques for classifying and identifying clinically significant microorganisms encountered in clinical specimens using a variety of identification systems. In addition, the learners are introduced to various susceptibility testing methods of bacterial pathogens. Students will also be introduced to the clinical significance of the organisms including associated diseases and pathogenicity. Laboratory sessions are conducted in two groups where the learners experience and perform hands-on practice of the various analytical procedures and techniques in microbiology to correctly identify and perform susceptibility testing. Quality control and safe laboratory practices are integral to the laboratory sessions.

MDML120 – Molecular Diagnostics

This course is intended to provide the learner with an introduction and/or review of foundational knowledge that will be built on as the student progresses through the Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) program. This knowledge will be applied later in the MLS program and in clinical practice in Clinical Chemistry, Hematology, Histotechnology, Microbiology and Transfusion Science. Weekly learning plans are presented on Blackboard to guide your learning. The MDML120 course has two main interrelated subject areas: Immunology and Molecular Diagnostics.

Immunology is the study of host reactions when foreign substances are introduced into the body. This course will review and expand on the basic and advanced concepts of Immunology as it relates to theory and practice in Medical Laboratory Science.

MDML120 Immunology topics include:

  • Basic concepts of immunity
  • Antigens and antibodies
  • Characteristics and functions of granulocytes, mononuclear cells, lymphocytes, plasma cells and soluble mediators of immunity
  • Principles of immunology applied to HLA typing

Molecular Diagnostics are procedures based on the detection and analysis of DNA and RNA. This relatively new field of investigation has multiple applications in Medical Laboratory Science. The testing modalities contribute to the prediction, diagnosis and treatment of disease and health processes.

MDML120 Molecular Diagnostic topics include:

  • Structure, function and synthesis of DNA and RNA, and proteins
  • Methods for preparation and analysis of nucleic acids
  • Methods for detection of mutations in human DNA
  • Variations in the human genome used in human identification
  • Applications of molecular diagnostics in detection and identification of microorganisms and genetic diseases
  • Applications of molecular diagnostics in detection and identification of somatic mutations in cancer
  • Molecular diagnostic and serological approaches to analysis of the immune system
  • Ethical issues in molecular diagnostics

Semester 3 – Fall

CCML240 – Clinical Chemistry II 

This course provides the learner with advanced knowledge of the Digestive, Nervous, Endocrine, Musculo-Skeletal and Cardiovascular body systems. The use of lectures enhances the information delivered in PPML110 and CCML112, specifically focusing on the primary disorders of each system. Laboratory sessions focus on the technical skills developed in INML120; the learner uses a variety of clinical instruments to perform relevant biochemical investigations. Learners correlate the results of these investigations with the primary disorders of each body system.

The course consists of classroom and laboratory sessions. Theoretical material is presented in two (2) 90-minute lectures per week. Lectures are complemented by learning objectives, a textbook, power point presentations and journal articles. One (1) 2-hour per week laboratory exercise is conducted in groups of 22. Laboratory sessions reinforce the theoretical concepts, safe laboratory practice and quality management. Each laboratory exercise represents a performance assessment task with linked competencies and learning objectives. A Standard Operating Procedure Manual is provided. All lecture notes, marking schemes for laboratory exercises, and other relevant course material will be posted on the Blackboard Learning System website.

HEML240 – Hematology I 

This course expands on the theory and methodology introduced in HEML120. The course will include three components:

1. The learner will continue to explore the pathophysiology of abnormal red cell morphology. The learner will focus on the correlation of clinical and laboratory findings in anemias to reach a diagnosis with special reference to the hemolytic anemias.

2. The laboratory sessions will help to develop the technical skills necessary for the investigation of anemias by maintaining and operating automated analyzers and by performing manual methods where appropriate. The theoretical concepts will be applied in ‘hands on’ laboratory exercises to enhance student’s learning. The course focuses on correlation of abnormal peripheral red blood cell morphology to clinical conditions and validation of the Complete Blood Count in the investigation of anemias.

3. The learner will reinforce the principles of primary and secondary hemostasis and the tests used to investigate disorders of hemostasis using automated as well as manual methods. The learning will be extended to fibrinolysis and regulatory mechanisms of hemostasis. Thrombotic disorders and anticoagulant treatment of thrombosis will also be discussed.

MIML240 – Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases I 

Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases I is the first of two courses that provide the learner with an examination of major infectious diseases and the clinically significant microorganisms associated with these diseases. The materials are presented according to body system/anatomical site with emphasis on identification of bacterial and yeast-like fungi. The learner will learn to recognize and differentiate between the pathogenic species from the normal flora. Viral, bacterial, fungal and parasitic agents affecting the different body systems, diagnostic immunological techniques and zoonotic organisms are in the curriculum. Principles and practices of quality management and safety are integral components in the laboratory and lecture classes.

RMIP231 – Introduction to Research Methods 

This course is designed to introduce you to research methods that can be applied to issues relevant to you and to your discipline.  For example, some students may apply research methods to writing and piloting a new protocol/policy; other students may utilize research to create educational material; and others may have a clinical question that can be answered through the application of research methods.

This course will help improve your practice by: making you more adept at reading and critically analyzing the scientific literature; prepare you for your clinical research and evaluation projects; and advance your skills in evidence-based clinical practice (EBCP).  For some students, it may also inspire you to make a contribution to the research in your respective areas of interest.

TSML230 – Transfusion Science 

This course provides the learner with the basic knowledge and skills to perform routine and investigative procedures in a clinical Transfusion Science laboratory. Didactic and laboratory sessions introduce the learner to blood grouping techniques, antibody investigation and compatibility testing, as well as the investigation and resolution of transfusion-related disorders such as hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn, immune hemolytic anemia and transfusion reactions.

Semester 4 – Winter

CCML250 – Clinical Chemistry III 

This course provides the learner with advanced knowledge of the Reproductive, Urinary, and Respiratory body systems. The use of lectures and tutorials enhances the information delivered in ANML110, PPML110 and CCML112, specifically focusing on the primary disorders of each system. Laboratory sessions focus on the technical skills developed in INML120; the learner uses a variety of clinical instruments to perform relevant biochemical investigations. Learners correlate the results of these investigations with the primary disorders of each body system. The principles and application of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) and Clinical Toxicology are also introduced in this course.

The course consists of theoretical and laboratory sessions. Theoretical material is presented either in instructional modules supported by tutorials or in lectures complemented by specific objectives and lecture outlines. Laboratory exercises are conducted in small groups and reinforce the theoretical concepts and emphasize safe laboratory practice. Each laboratory exercise has defined practical outcomes and a Clinical Chemistry Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) Manual will be provided. All lecture notes, marking schemes for laboratory exercises, and other relevant course material will be posted and available as required on the Blackboard Learning System website.

HEML250 – Hematology II 

This course introduces the learner to the pathophysiology and diagnosis of infection, leukemia and other abnormal leukocyte disorders and stresses the abnormal leukocyte morphology characteristically seen in certain conditions.. The use of lectures and laboratory sessions enhances and expands on the theory and practical techniques learned in the previous three Hematology courses and the concepts of Quality Assurance and Safety are reinforced. Laboratory techniques are either taught in theory or performed in the laboratory and include peripheral blood and bone marrow assessment, body fluid analysis, cytochemical staining, flow cytometry, cytogenetics and molecular diagnostic techniques.

The course consists of classroom and laboratory sessions over a 13 week period. The course is 40% classroom theory-based and 60% laboratory technology-based. The course is 65 hours in length over a 13 week period. There is one 2-hour lecture per week and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Classroom time will be used for quizzes and the mid-term exam.

HIML251 – Histotechnology & Special Stains

This course provides the learner with a continuation and expansion of Histological techniques and staining theory introduced in HIML 110. Laboratory sessions will introduce the learner to a variety of special stain techniques used for identifying various tissue constituents and components, both normal and abnormal, as learned in AMML110, the microanatomy course. The procedures introduced in this course will enable the learners to perform histological techniques used in the laboratory investigation and diagnosis of disorders of the body systems.

The course consists of classroom and laboratory sessions over a 13 week period. The course is 50% classroom theory-based and 50% laboratory technology-based. The course is 65 hours in length over a 13 week period. There is one 2-hour lecture per week and one 3-hour laboratory per week. Dates are dependent upon lab groups. 

IPCL252 – Interprofessional Simulated Clinical Preparation

This course is designed to build upon previous interprofessional foundational courses and to further develop your interpersonal and interprofessional competencies. Themes of Communication & Feedback, Quality & Safety and Ethical Patient Care are the foci of this course. Using a variety of simulation-based learning modalities (e.g., online, video debrief, standardized patients, small group), you will practice using communication strategies and models to support ethical patient-centred care and interprofessional practice.

Learners will practice using a variety of tools and models to support simulation based education. In particular, the MSR video based debrief model developed by the MSR Israel Center for Medical Simulation at the Sheba Medical Center will be used. MSR is one of the world’s foremost centers for patient safety and education and considered an international leader in simulation enhanced education. MSR describes simulation-based health education as a complement to cognitive learning and offers students a safe environment to learn from errors without risk of harming real patients.

This course follows a hybrid learning design. Some sessions will occur online where you will engage with your group of approximately 24 students in self and peer-collaborative activities (Weeks 1, 4, 6, 10 and 12). Groups will also participate in face to face sessions with their faculty (Weeks 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 11, 13 and 14).

MIML250 – Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases II

MIML 250 is the second of two microbiology courses that provide the learners with a survey of clinically significant microorganisms and the major infectious diseases these microorganisms cause in the Urinary, Reproductive, Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, and Cardiovascular systems. Materials are presented according to body system. Bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic agents are discussed, and the emphasis is on identification and susceptibility testing of clinically significant bacteria, and yeast-like fungi. Students will enhance their knowledge of identifying multi-resistant microorganisms. Laboratory exercises are conducted in smaller groups where theoretical concepts are reinforced, and safe laboratory practices are highlighted.

The learners experience and perform hands-on practice of analytical techniques in microbiology to correctly identify and perform susceptibility testing on the clinically significant microorganisms isolated from given simulated specimens. The laboratory sessions consist of unmarked and marked laboratory exercises, where the primary goal of the unmarked laboratory exercises is to introduce the clinically significant microorganisms and normal flora that can be isolated from the specific body systems. In addition, students are introduced to molecular diagnostic techniques and its application to microbiology. 

TSML242 – Transfusion Practices

This course provides the learner with a continuation and expansion of the theory of transfusion science begun in TSML230. While the previous course concentrated on the testing to determine compatibility of red cell products and included a large practical component, this course will explore the blood products themselves and is exclusively theory based. Students will use current web pages of the Canadian Blood Services as well as the required text to investigate the most up-to-date information on the production, management and indications for use of all components produced from blood donation. The course will be facilitated as group discussions regarding current practices and the benefits and risks associated with transfusion. Upon completion of this course the learner will be able to select the appropriate blood component for the conditions and appreciate the complex issues surrounding blood transfusion in Canada. Part of this course will be online learning through instructor posted notes and website use and some of the product information will be presented by the students during the Patient Case PAT 3. All of that material is testable on the final exam.

Semester 5 – Summer 

CLML252 – Clinical Education l

This course provides the students with an experience in a simulated laboratory environment prior to their CLML361 Clinical Education II course. The students will be assessed on specific laboratory competencies in the five Medical Laboratory Science (MLS) disciplines as well as their overall readiness to attend the clinical semester. The simulated laboratory is meant to more closely resemble the typical laboratory, with regards to work volume, work flow and requirement for multi-tasking, than the laboratory sessions given throughout the previous semesters of the program. Students will be assessed on laboratory techniques as well as communication, professionalism and team work as it applies to Medical Laboratory Science.

Each student will be assigned a lab group. Each lab group will rotate through the disciplines every two weeks.

Semesters 6/7 – Fall/Winter 

CLML361 Clinical Education II 

This course provides the students with 20 weeks clinical experience in the clinical laboratory environment prior to graduation from their program and writing the CSMLS National Certification Exam. The students will be assessed on specific laboratory competencies in the five Medical Laboratory Science disciplines as well as their overall readiness to enter practice as a Medical Laboratory Technologist. This clinical education course is meant to provide students with a more typical laboratory work volume, work flow and requirement for multi-tasking, than was provided by the simulated laboratory sessions in the previous semester. Students will be assessed on laboratory techniques as well as Michener’s Core Abilities: communication, professionalism and team work as it applies to Medical Laboratory Science. Clinical competencies have been harmonized with UOIT and St. Lawrence College Medical Laboratory Science Programs.

 

 


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